Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a shallow looking, non-invasive, subsurface investigation technique capable of mapping interfaces in a cross-sectional format. GPR measures the propagation time of high frequency electromagnetic pulses that are reflected from interfaces between materials of different electrical properties. Typically, radar reflections occur with abrupt changes in moisture content, grain size, porosity, or soil texture.

Depth to Bedrock

GPR is a cost-effective, high-resolution method to fully define soil stratigraphy, bedrock interfaces, fracture zones and groundwater surfaces. GPR surveys reveal detailed information about the subsurface in a non-intrusive manner.

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Bathymetry

GPR can be used to study underwater depth, estimate water volumes and reveal sub-bottom stratigraphy. It is the most suitable method to use under frozen conditions.

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Buried Objects

GPR surveys are often used to locate objects such as buried tanks, fibreglass or plastic lines, and utility corridors. The appeal of GPR is its ability to detect subtle changes in soils. Thus, GPR can be used for forensic and archeology applications to locate buried structures and features.

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3-D Imaging

Advances in GPR data collection and processing now make it possible to produce a 3-D visualization of the area of interest. Presentation in 3-D allows for much greater accuracy in representation and interpretation.



© 2014 AKS Geoscience Inc.
Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a shallow looking, non-invasive, subsurface investigation technique capable of mapping interfaces in a cross-sectional format. GPR measures the propagation time of high frequency electromagnetic pulses that are reflected from interfaces between materials of different electrical properties. Typically, radar reflections occur with abrupt changes in moisture content, grain size, porosity, or soil texture.

Depth to Bedrock

GPR is a cost-effective, high-resolution method to fully define soil stratigraphy, bedrock interfaces, fracture zones and groundwater surfaces. GPR surveys reveal detailed information about the subsurface in a non-intrusive manner.

View Presentation

Bathymetry

GPR can be used to study underwater depth, estimate water volumes and reveal sub-bottom stratigraphy. It is the most suitable method to use under frozen conditions.

View Presentation

Buried Objects

GPR surveys are often used to locate objects such as buried tanks, fibreglass or plastic lines, and utility corridors. The appeal of GPR is its ability to detect subtle changes in soils. Thus, GPR can be used for forensic and archeology applications to locate buried structures and features.

View Presentation

3-D Imaging

Advances in GPR data collection and processing now make it possible to produce a 3-D visualization of the area of interest. Presentation in 3-D allows for much greater accuracy in representation and interpretation.



© 2014 AKS Geoscience Inc.
Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a shallow looking, non-invasive, subsurface investigation technique capable of mapping interfaces in a cross-sectional format. GPR measures the propagation time of high frequency electromagnetic pulses that are reflected from interfaces between materials of different electrical properties. Typically, radar reflections occur with abrupt changes in moisture content, grain size, porosity, or soil texture.

Depth to Bedrock

GPR is a cost-effective, high-resolution method to fully define soil stratigraphy, bedrock interfaces, fracture zones and groundwater surfaces. GPR surveys reveal detailed information about the subsurface in a non-intrusive manner.

View Presentation

Bathymetry

GPR can be used to study underwater depth, estimate water volumes and reveal sub-bottom stratigraphy. It is the most suitable method to use under frozen conditions.

View Presentation

Buried Objects

GPR surveys are often used to locate objects such as buried tanks, fibreglass or plastic lines, and utility corridors. The appeal of GPR is its ability to detect subtle changes in soils. Thus, GPR can be used for forensic and archeology applications to locate buried structures and features.

View Presentation

3-D Imaging

Advances in GPR data collection and processing now make it possible to produce a 3-D visualization of the area of interest. Presentation in 3-D allows for much greater accuracy in representation and interpretation.

© 2014 AKS Geoscience Inc.